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Civil War Battlefields – Gettysburg to Appomattox

Gettysburg – Frederick – Harpers Ferry & Antietam – Manassas – Fredericksburg – Richmond – Appomattox & Charlottesville
Trip Length
6-10 days
Route Distance
385 mi
Stops
8
Overview

History buffs should be excited by this wonderful Civil War-themed GenieTrip from Gettysburg to Antietam to Charlottesville and much in between. “The Journey Through Hallowed Ground”, a National Heritage Area, is a 180-mile-long area highlighting key Civil War sites in four states: Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia. The area boasts more than 10,000 historic sites, 49 National Historic Districts, 13 National Parks, nine presidential libraries, wineries, breweries, charming towns, plus American Revolution historic sites. The area has the highest concentration of historic sites anywhere in America. We have selected seven of the most popular and important stops – Gettysburg, Pennsylvania; Frederick/Antietam, Maryland; Harpers Ferry, West Virginia; Manassas, Virginia; Richmond, Virginia; and, Appomattox and Charlottesville, Virginia.

This Trip Is Great For
History lovers will enjoy this trip. We selected eight sites to visit that are important and well-designed for learning. This trip has plenty of opportunities for outdoor recreation as well as charming towns along the way for visitors who want more than just Civil War historic sites. Kids with an interest in history will enjoy this trip, albeit with shorter visits at each stop
Gettysburg, PA
1-2 day stay
Description - Gettysburg

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, is one of the most well-known stops on this trip. This is where President Abraham Lincoln gave his famous Gettysburg Address; and it is also the site of a pivotal 1863 Civil War Battle of the same name, which was a turning point in the war for the Union Army. But there are many other Interesting Civil War historic sites nearby. The charming small town of Gettysburg has good dining (some places even serve food popular during the Civil War) and shopping, as well as frequent Living History presentations.

Top Things to Do - Gettysburg

Gettysburg is rich in history and importance. Here are some of the top things to see and do here:

Gettysburg National Military Park – Battlefield, Museum & Visitor Center – The Battle of Gettysburg is often called the "High Water Mark of the Rebellion.” It was also the war’s bloodiest battle and the inspiration for President Lincoln’s famed “Gettysburg Address.” Start your tour at the Visitor Center to get an overview of the park, plan your time, and arrange a battlefield tour – seeing the 6,000 acres will help tie the history to the geography of this huge expanse where the fighting took place. Auto, group, horseback, biking, self-guided or professionally guided tours are available. Adjacent to the Visitor Center is the world-class Gettysburg Museum of the American Civil War with informational and interactive exhibits that appeal to all ages and teach about the battle as well as the history of the Civil War. The not- to-be-missed, compelling 20-minute film, A New Birth of Freedom helps viewers better understand the battle; while the Museum helps visitors better understand the history and logistics. Check the schedule for living history demonstrations and reenactments which are well done and frequent. Be sure to stop at the Gettysburg Soldiers’ National Cemetery where Lincoln delivered his address and the final resting place of 3,500 fallen Civil War soldiers.

Ticket to the Past—Unforgettable Journeys the Virtual Reality Experience at the Gettysburg Lincoln Railroad Station – kids and adults will love this virtual reality experience at the old railroad station where Lincoln arrived for his famous Gettysburg Address. The experience allows you to follow the journey of one of three historic figures.

Historic Homes and Museums – Gettysburg boasts several restored homes from the Civil War which are high quality. The Jennie Wade House showcases the home of the only civilian to die in the Battle of Gettysburg. The David Wills House, Shriver House, Daniel Lady Farm, and Seminary Ridge Museum are also worth seeing.

Eisenhower National Historic Site – while Ike wasn’t around for the Civil War, Gettysburg is where President Eisenhower lived several times, retired to, and traveled to during his presidency to meet with various world leaders. The site provides a “warm and personal” look at the lives of Mammie and Ike Eisenhower. It is located next to the Gettysburg Battlefield and is a pleasant and educational stop before or after the Battlefield.

National Civil War Museum – About an hour north of Gettysburg in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, is one of the largest museums solely dedicated to the “War between the States” – its history, causes, impacts, and the lives of those affected by this war. If you have the time, it’s worth a trip.

Where To Stay Near - Gettysburg

There are no camping options inside the Gettysburg Military Park, but there are dozens in and around Gettysburg, as well as dozens of private campgrounds nearby. There are six Pennsylvania State Parks within 15-60 minutes of Gettysburg: Caledonia, Pine Grove Furnace, Mont Alto, Codorus, Gifford Pinchot, and Colonel Denning. Let AdventureGenie help you find the perfect campground for your visit to Gettysburg – press “Take This Trip” and select campgrounds that match your preferences!

Activities Near - Gettysburg
Battlefields - Battlefield Tour - Ranger-Led Programs - Guided Tours - Driving Tours - Self-Guided Tours - Museums - Historic Sites - Historic Homes - Living History - Historic Re-Enactments - Wineries - Dining - Hiking - Biking - Horseback Riding
Frederick, MD
1-2 day stay
Description - Frederick

This section of western Maryland has a lesser known but very important battlefield, Monocacy, as well as the fabulous National Museum of Civil War Medicine. The Battle was the location of the last Confederate victory on Union soil. Frederick also has several historic homes and museums, (as well as hiking, biking, canoeing, dining and shopping).

Top Things to Do - Frederick

Check out these great Civil War Historical Sites near Frederick, Maryland:

Monocacy National Battlefield – Even though Union forces were defeated at Monocacy in July of 1864, the encounter is called “The Battle that Saved Washington,” since it delayed (and ultimately stymied) Confederate plans to invade Washington, D.C. and influence the 1864 presidential elections. The Monocacy Battlefield is in a beautiful rural setting with rolling hills and trees, with six walking trails to stretch your legs. Consider the self-guided auto tour with a free audio guide. Special events such as re-enactments, commemorations, and lectures are held regularly (see Events Calendar).

National Museum of Civil War Medicine – this sobering and inspiring museum tries to link lessons from the past to today with interactive exhibits, storytelling, and special events. Discover the sacrifices, skills, innovations, and techniques used during the Civil War to save wounded soldiers’ lives.

Fredericktown Hessian Barracks – tour the exterior of this historic place which held captured Hessian soldiers during the American Revolution, and was then a state armory, fairgrounds, a Civil War hospital, and eventually the Maryland School for the Deaf.

Historical Society of Frederick County – check out the small museum and its low cost bus and walking tours that explore the county’s role in American history, including the American Revolution and Civil War.

National Shrine of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton – In nearby Emmitsburg, the Shrine commemorates the life of 19th Century Elizabeth Ann Seton, the first U.S.-born person to become a Saint in the Roman Catholic Church. Start at the Museum and Visitor Center (don’t miss the 12-minute film) and then continue on a tour of the Basilica, farmhouse, and the St. Seton’s working houses. Kids will enjoy interacting with in-character staff at this living history museum.

Heart of Civil War Heritage Area Visitor Center – open seasonally, this NPS-run and staffed visitor center provides information, maps and brochures on the Civil War sites of three nearby Maryland counties. Some use it as a basecamp for exploring important sites such as Antietam, Gettysburg, Monocacy, South Mountain, Harpers Ferry, Baltimore and Washington, D.C.

Where To Stay Near - Frederick

Frederick is an area that has more public land campgrounds than private. For public land camping, consider: Gambrill State Park, Cunningham Falls State Park, Greenbrier State Park, Little Bennet County Park, Brunswick City Park, and Catoctin Mountain Park’s Owens Creek Campground. There are several private campgrounds as well. Let AdventureGenie help you pick the perfect campground for your RV trip to Fredericksburg and Civil War history.

Activities Near - Frederick
Battlefields - Ranger-Led Programs - Guided Tours - Driving Tours - Self-Guided Tours - Living History Demonstrations - Museums - Historic Sites - Walking Tours - Hiking - Biking - Shopping
Harpers Ferry, WV
1-2 day stay
Description - Harpers Ferry

The picturesque town of Harpers Ferry played an outsize strategic role in the Civil War due to its location at the confluence of the Potomac and Shenandoah Rivers, two transportation canals, abundant firearm factories, and the location of the U.S. Arsenal and Armory. As such, the town switched hands eight different times during the war, though it remained under Union control 80% of the time. Six days after the first shots in the Civil War were fired at Fort Sumter, South Carolina, Harpers Ferry was attacked by the Virginia Militia (for the Confederate side). The Battle of Harpers Ferry was fought in 1862 and was a decisive Confederate Victory, leading to the largest surrender of American soldiers until World War II.

The town is also famous for the John Brown rebellion in 1859 when a band of radical abolitionists raided the U.S. Arsenal and Armory and Hall’s Rifle Works to spur a slave rebellion, but the town was retaken quickly by state and national forces. The Battle of Harpers Ferry in September of 1862 was where Confederate forces under General “Stonewall” Jackson besieged the garrison forced the surrender of 13,000 Union soldiers (the largest surrender of American forces until the Second World War.

This area was also the site of the famous 1862 Battle of Antietam, where 23,000 soldiers lost their lives, which was all part of an effort for control of nearby Harpers Ferry due to its strategic importance and supply and communication lines. In all, nearly 13,000 Union troops, 13,000 arms and 47 pieces of artillery were captured by the Confederacy. It is no wonder Antietam is often called “the bloodiest day in American history.” Antietam led to President Abraham Lincoln issuing the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.

Harpers Ferry today is a charming riverside mountain town with shops, inns, restaurants and great outdoor activities such as river rafting and hiking on the Appalachian Trail. Civil War lovers or not – everyone will enjoy this great town.

Top Things to Do - Harpers Ferry

With so much to see and do in Harpers Ferry, here are a few of the top attractions:

Harper’s Ferry National Historical Park – this park is packed with interesting overlooks, historic buildings, museums, hikes and things to see in its 3,500 acres. The park is divided into ten distinct areas with Lower Town being the most popular. Don’t miss these sites: John Brown’s Fort, Pry House Field Hospital Museum, Industry House Museum, Dunker Church, ranger-led battlefield "walk & talk" tours, a self-guided auto tour, and the Harper Cemetery. The Park offers great opportunities for hiking, biking, climbing, fishing, and picnicking. Consider hiring a certified guide for a more detailed and personalized tour. The National Park Service has a recommended one-day itinerary.

Antietam National Battlefield – 18 miles from Harpers Ferry lies the naturally beautiful 3,000-acre Antietam National Battlefield in Sharpsburg, Maryland. Top things to see and do include: Visitor Center, National Cemetery, a self-guided auto tour, ranger-led programs, and self-guided hikes. The many overlooks and vistas will make you forget the tragic history of this battlefield. The National Park Service lists certified private guides for those looking for a more in-depth experience at Antietam. The Park also offers a calendar of programs, re-enactments, lectures, guided hikes, and more.

C&O Canal National Historical Park – The Chesapeake & Ohio Canal runs 185 miles from Cumberland, Maryland, to Washington, D.C. The tow path runs the whole length, offering hiking, biking and paddling opportunities as well as mule-drawn canal boat rides.

Outdoor Pursuits – Harpers Ferry is an outdoor enthusiast’s dream! Both the Appalachian Trail and Blue Ridge Parkway run through the town. Hiking, rafting, horseback riding, and boating opportunities are plentiful.

Where To Stay Near - Harpers Ferry

Thankfully, Harpers Ferry offers many RV camping opportunities with options for both public and private campgrounds. For public land campgrounds, consider those listed in the previous stop for Frederick, Maryland. Let AdventureGenie help you find the perfect campground for your road trip to Harpers Ferry and Antietam!

Activities Near - Harpers Ferry
Battlefields - Historic Sites - Ranger-Led Programs - Guided Tours - Driving Tours - Self-Guided Tours - Museums - Historic Sites - Hiking - Boating - Canal Boat Tours - Rock Climbing - Canoeing, Kayaking, & Paddling - Whitewater Rafting - Dining
Manassas, VA
1-2 day stay
Description - Manassas

About 40 miles southeast of Washington, D.C. is the bustling town of Manassas (which is quickly becoming a suburb of D.C.). The Battle of Manassas is more commonly known as the Battles of Bull Run. The first Bull Run (1861) was the first major battle of the Civil War. The second Battle of Bull Run in 1862 left 22,000 soldiers dead. Both were significant Confederate victories. The 5,000-acre Manassas National Battlefield Park, run by the National Park Service, offers high quality tours, a visitor center, walking trails and more. Manassas has a wonderful 18-stop Civil War History Trail with significant historic sites, including the Battlefield Park.

Top Things to Do - Manassas

Consider these popular activities in the Manassas area:

Manassas National Battlefield Park – Start your visit at the Henry Hill Visitor Center & Museum and watch the 45-minute orientation educational film about the battles fought at Bull Run. Take the 20-mile self-guided driving tour (about two hours long), and consider using the free Bull Run Battle App from the American Battlefield Trust. There are also wonderful ranger-led walking tours and self-guided hiking tours. If you have time, visit the Brawner Farm Interpretive Center and the historic Stone House.

The Winery at Bull Run – Adjacent to the Battlefield Park is a charming winery that offers historical walking tours paired with wine tastings (of its locally produced wines) along the way.

Ben Lomond Historic Site – This former plantation was used by the Confederacy as a hospital after the first Battle of Bull Run in 1861. You can still see the signatures of soldiers who occupied the house. See the home, a restored slave quarter, smokehouse and a rose garden.

Bristoe Station Battlefield Heritage Park – In nearby Bristow, tour the battlefields of the smaller Battle of Kettle Run (1862) and Battle of Bristoe Station (1863) at this 140-acre park. There are hiking and equestrian trails but no bathroom facilities. Use the Bristoe Station Campaign Cell App for a guided audio tour.

Farm Brew Live – Eat, drink, and listen at this wonderful indoor/outdoor entertainment, dining, and craft brewery which is a popular local hangout that you don’t want to miss!

Where To Stay Near - Manassas

The Manassas area has a surprising number of public and private campgrounds including eight nearby public land parks: Bull Run Regional Park, Burke Lake Park, Oak Ridge Campground, Leesylvania State Park, Lake Fairfax Park, Pohick Bay Regional Park, Smallwood State Park, and Prince William Forest RV Campground. Press “Take This Trip” and let AdventureGenie help you plan your Civil War road trip and find the perfect campgrounds!

Activities Near - Manassas
Battlefields - Historic Sites - Driving Tours - Self-Guided Tours - Ranger-Led Programs - Hiking - Biking - Horseback Riding - Dining & Entertainment
Fredericksburg, VA
1-3 day stay
Description - Fredericksburg

Fredericksburg is home to not one but FOUR Civil War battlefields – Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania Courthouse, Chancellorsville, and Wilderness – plus the site of General “Stonewall” Jackson’s death. The four battlefields are encompassed in the National Park Service’s Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park. Each battlefield has a driving tour with written descriptions from the NPS phone app. Only Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville offer visitor centers and ranger-led programs. For those doing a tour of all four battlefields, we recommend you see them in the order presented in the Highlights section below.

Historically, the epic Battles of Fredericksburg (1862) and Chancellorsville (1863) were major Confederate victories early in the war, both with significant casualties. They also emboldened the Confederacy to launch the Gettysburg Campaign to invade the North. The inconclusive 1864 Battles of Spotsylvania Courthouse and Wilderness were among the bloodiest of the war, with heavier losses on the Union side and 25-30,000 casualties at each battle.

Top Things to Do - Fredericksburg

If you plan on seeing all four battlefields here, allow at least two days with two battlefields per day. Civil War buffs will be tired but thrilled to tour these locations. Here's what to see and do:

Fredericksburg Battlefield – Stop at the visitor center and check out the ranger-led programs. Take the driving tour. Be sure to stop at Chatham Manor, a former plantation turned into a hospital, headquarters and communication center during the battle. Fredericksburg Battlefield has seven hiking trails that lead to important battle locations.

Chancellorsville Battlefield – Stop at the visitor center and check out the ranger-led programs. Take the driving tours. Be sure to stop at the Old Salem Church, the Chancellor House site, Hazel Grove, and Fairview. One of the four battlefield hiking trails takes you to where General Jackson was wounded.

Wilderness Battlefield – After a stop at the Wilderness Exhibit Shelter to get an overview of the battle, follow the driving tour. Be sure to stop at nearby Elwood Manor, a staffed and partially restored farm overlooking Wilderness. Check out of one of the five history-filled hiking trails.

Spotsylvania Courthouse Battlefield – Start your driving tour with a stop at the Spotsylvania Battlefield Exhibit Shelter to get an overview of the battle. Check out the two hiking trails winding through the battlefield.

General “Stonewall” Jackson’s Death Site at Fairfield/Chandler Plantation – Famed General Jackson died at this farm 10 miles south of Fredericksburg in 1864 during the Battle of Chancellorsville. He was injured by friendly fire, subsequently had his arm amputated, and died six days later. The grounds are open year-round but the house is only open seasonally.

Where To Stay Near - Fredericksburg

The areas in and around Fredericksburg offer a mix of private and public land campgrounds. Three State Parks – Lake Anna, Leesylvania, and Smallwood, – are good options. Press “Take This Trip” and AdventureGenie can help you plan your trip and select great campgrounds for your Civil War tour in and around Fredericksburg.

Activities Near - Fredericksburg
Battlefields - Guided Tours - Self-Guided Tours - Driving Tours - Historic Sites - Ranger-Led Programs - Hiking
Richmond, VA
1-3 day stay
Description - Richmond

Located only 100 miles from Washington, D.C., Richmond, Virginia, was the headquarters and industrial center of the Confederacy. It’s no surprise that Union Forces sought to capture Richmond, given its manufacturing dominance. The town fell to Union forces in 1865, days before Confederate General and Commander Robert E. Lee surrendered in Appomattox Courthouse. The Richmond National Battlefield includes 13 different sites where battles large and small took place to defend Richmond as well as key sites to support the war effort such as an ironworks and hospital. The 13 sites, spread out over three counties and the city of Richmond on an 80-mile route, are highlighted in the park’s map. For a driving tour of Richmond Battlefield Park and nearby Petersburg Battlefield, use the American Battlefield Trust’s itinerary.

Richmond has so many important Civil War historic sites that it’s hard to figure out what’s best. Below we recommend some of the most popular. If you have time and interest to see another important battlefield, check out the Petersburg National Battlefield about 40 miles south of Richmond.

Top Things to Do - Richmond

Richmond is so steeped in Civil War history that it can be confusing to know how to spend your time. We recommend the following top-rated sites and attractions:

Richmond National Battlefield Park – Spend a day or two checking out the 13 sites on this 2,300-acre battlefield overseen by the NPS. The stops are spread out over 80 miles, so plan accordingly. Popular stops include: Cold Harbor Battlefield, Gaines’ Mill, Glendale National Cemetery, Malvern Hills, Drewry’s Bluff, and the Chimborazo Medical Museum (formerly a Civil War hospital). Start your tour at the Visitor Center at Tredegar Iron Works, a former important munition factory in downtown Richmond. Do NOT miss the American Civil War Museum at the Historic Tredegar Iron Works. The Park offers multiple visitors centers, museums, exhibits, talks, tours, living history demonstrations, and special events.

White House of the Confederacy – One of three museum sites operated by the American Civil War Museum in downtown Richmond, this home served as the personal residence and office of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, until he fled with his family days before General Robert E. Lee surrendered to U.S. General Ulysses S. Grant. Even President Lincoln visited here. Today, it is well-preserved and offers a perspective on the impact of war for all those affected – white, black, free, and enslaved.

Virginia State Capitol – This imposing building in downtown Richmond stands in ironic testament to the survival of democracy. Designed by Governor Thomas Jefferson in 1785, this building saw the Virginia ratification of the Bill of Rights, the vote to secede from the Union by the Virginia General Assembly, the location of the Confederate Congress, and the location of Virginia’s certification of the Electoral College during presidential elections. If these walls could talk! Free one-hour guided tours are available every day including Sundays.

Historic Districts – Check out a wonderful Richmond historic district for taste of 19th century life. The Church Hill Historic District is filled with 19th century buildings, including homes, hip eateries, shops, and world-class bakeries. The historic St. John’s Church is where Patrick Henry gave his famous speech “Give me liberty or give me death!”. In summers, the church hosts re-enactments of the nine Founding Fathers’ debate. Tours are available but please be respectful since it is still an active congregation. Richmond has several other historic districts worth considering.

Petersburg National Battlefield – Nine months before the fall of Richmond in 1865, U.S. troops besieged General Lee’s troops, resulting in 70,000 causalities. By cutting off supply lines, the fall of Richmond was ensured as Lee’s army declined. This 2,700-acre site has plenty of history but also great hiking, biking, and even fishing, Check in at the Eastern Front Visitor Center for information on guided, self-guided and auto tours. At the museum, watch the 18-minute video to learn about the battlefield and see artifacts from the 292-day siege. Don’t miss the Poplar Grove National Cemetery where thousands of fallen Confederate soldiers are buried.

Where To Stay Near - Richmond

None of the National Battlefields in the Richmond area offers camping but there are many good options. If you want a state park, check out beautiful Pocahontas State Park. Click on “Take This Trip” and let AdventureGenie help you find a great campground for your stop in Richmond on your Civil War tour!

Activities Near - Richmond
Battlefields - Ranger-Led Programs - Guided Tours - Driving Tours - Self-Guided Tours - Museums - Historic Sites - Historic Districts - Dining - Shopping - Hiking - Biking - Fishing
Appomattox & Charlottesville, VA
1-3 day stay
Description - Appomattox & Charlottesville

After leaving Richmond, drive north to the town of Appomattox, Virginia, where General Robert E. Lee surrendered his Army of Northern Virginia to U.S. General Ulysses S. Grant on April 9, 1865, as the result of an eight-day campaign that ended here. The historic surrender happened at the McLean house over several days as terms of surrender were negotiated. The war hobbled along a few more months after this as Confederate troops gradually surrendered across the country. President Lincoln received the good news of surrender and was assassinated three days later in Washington, D.C., by John Wilkes Booth.

Top Things to Do - Appomattox & Charlottesville

Discover where the Civil War ended by visiting these important sites:

Appomattox Courthouse National Historical Park – see where it all ended, and Reconstruction could begin. The National Park Service does a wonderful job presenting the import of this battlefield through ranger-led guided programs, living history actors, tours, a film and artifacts. The 1,700-acre park has miles of hiking trails to enjoy.

American Civil War Museum – Appomattox – Visit this wonderful museum with over 400 artifacts (including the uniform General Lee wore at the surrender), photos, and documents. It provides unique insight into the Civil War and the surrender at Appomattox.

Charlottesville and Monticello – for those looking for more history, continue on to Charlottesville, Virginia, to see Thomas Jefferson's farm and slave plantation, Monticello. During the war, (long after Jefferson's death), the Confederacy seized and occupied Monticello because it was owned by a northerner, Uriah Levy. The estate was eventually returned to the Levy family. Charlottesville experienced almost no fighting during the Civil War but served as a resource for arms, uniforms, and artificial limbs. For a more in-depth visit to historic Charlottesville and Monticello, check out the GenieTrip, Southern Mountain Magic – Skyline Drive & Blue Ridge Parkway

Where To Stay Near - Appomattox & Charlottesville

The small town of Appomattox has a few private campgrounds and one state park: Holliday Lake State Park. If you continue on to Charlottesville there are more camping options. Either way, press “Take This Trip,” and let AdventureGenie help you plan your Civil War trip and find the perfect campgrounds for Appomattox and Charlottesville!

Activities Near - Appomattox & Charlottesville
Historic Homes & Buildings - Ranger-Led Programs - Self-Guided Tours - Living History Programs - Presidential Library - Museums - Hiking - Biking -
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Civil War Battlefields – Gettysburg to Appomattox

Gettysburg – Frederick – Harpers Ferry & Antietam – Manassas – Fredericksburg – Richmond – Appomattox & Charlottesville
Length
6-10 days
Distance
385 mi
Stops
7

Overview

History buffs should be excited by this wonderful Civil War-themed GenieTrip from Gettysburg to Antietam to Charlottesville and much in between. “The Journey Through Hallowed Ground”, a National Heritage Area, is a 180-mile-long area highlighting key Civil War sites in four states: Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia. The area boasts more than 10,000 historic sites, 49 National Historic Districts, 13 National Parks, nine presidential libraries, wineries, breweries, charming towns, plus American Revolution historic sites. The area has the highest concentration of historic sites anywhere in America. We have selected seven of the most popular and important stops – Gettysburg, Pennsylvania; Frederick/Antietam, Maryland; Harpers Ferry, West Virginia; Manassas, Virginia; Richmond, Virginia; and, Appomattox and Charlottesville, Virginia.

This Trip Is Great For

History lovers will enjoy this trip. We selected eight sites to visit that are important and well-designed for learning. This trip has plenty of opportunities for outdoor recreation as well as charming towns along the way for visitors who want more than just Civil War historic sites. Kids with an interest in history will enjoy this trip, albeit with shorter visits at each stop
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